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Sports Medicine F.A.Q.'s:

1. Q: How might one define Sports Medicine?

2. Q: I'm a high school student and I want to study sports medicine. Which courses should I study now?

3. Q: Do I need a Master's degree?

4. Q: What's the best school program to study sports medicine?

5. Q: Where can I find more information on sports medicine?

6. Q: What are the salary ranges in sports medicine?

7. Q: What can I do for my players who suffer slight sprains such as ankles or writs?

Common Sports Medicine Q&As

1. Q: How might one define Sports Medicine?

A: Sports medicine is a term used to refer to many different areas of exercise and sports science. Sports medicine refers performance and caring for injury. Sports medicine includes many areas of specialization such as athletic training, biomechanics, clinical medicine, exercise physiology, kinesiology, massage therapy, orthopedics, physical therapy, sports nutrition, and sports psychology.

The American College of Sports Medicine defines sports medicine as multi-disciplinary, including the physiological, biomechanical, psychological, and pathological phenomena associated with exercise and sports.

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Common Sports Medicine Q&As


2. Q: I'm a high school student and I want to study sports medicine. Which do I need to study?

A: Do the basic science and math routine….and do it well! Nothing is more important than good grades…except, of course, your personal character and concern for your fellow man. If you have a genuine concern for people, and if you have good grades, you'll have more chances to do well in the profession and also get into the college you want. The main courses for preparing for undergraduate school are in science and health such as chemistry, biology, statistics, physiology, anatomy. But you also want to study psychology, sociology, ethics and philosophy. One day you must treat the entire person….mind, body and spirit.

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Common Sports Medicine Q&As


3. Q: Do I need a Master's degree?

A: Probably. Some specialties such as Physical Therapy and Orthopedics require a Master's degree. But because the practice of most professions requires a certification, first you might want to find out what degree is required to get certified.

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Common Sports Medicine Q&As


4. Q: What's the best school program to study sports medicine?

A: Choose only accredited colleges and university programs. Find out if the program satisfies all the requirements for the profession? Does the program provide practica, internships, clinical and hands-on experience under other professionals? Does it also prepare you for the certification? Ask yourself questions like these when choosing a program. Also, talk to professionals already in the field.

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Common Sports Medicine Q&As


5. Q: Where can I find more information on sports medicine?

A: There are dozens of websites and links on the Internet. Search on your favorite search engines for any of the following key words: sports medicine, sports fitness, health and wellness, sports injuries, sports science

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Common Sports Medicine Q&As


6. Q: What are the salary ranges in sports medicine?

A: Salaries varies based on the specialization in sports medicine that you choose. A professional therapist may earn $45,000-$50,000. Many professionals go into private practice for themselves and earn according to the structure and success of their business. Professionals such as physicians, orthopedics doctors, and specialty doctors can earn much more, usually over $100,000 per year.

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Common Sports Medicine Q&As


7. Q: What can I do for my players who suffer slight sprains such as ankles or writsts?

A: It is always best to consult a physician or a medical specialist for a professional evaluation and treatment. If it is a minor injury, many sports trainers use the RICE therapy: Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation.

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